Tag Archives: Disassembly

Disassembly

SD2SNES Pro SuperCIC Compatibility

Today, I wanted to try out the pre-release sgb06 firmware. It is a fork of the original SD2SNES (aka FXPAK) firmware and implements support for the Nintendo Super Game Boy 2. After I had set everything up, I was wondering why the SuperCIC was disabled. I remembered then that I had bought a SD2SNES Pro last year, but never used it because of this:

Right now, it seems to have a bug when used in combination with a SuperCIC. As soon as the SuperCIC is enabled in the configuration, there is no picture and sync is lost (also, weird readings on the OSSC display). Upon switching the frequency, the LED of the console turns red and is stuck in that status. According to this thread, a firmware update is needed for one of the SuperCIC chips. I’m looking forward to see if this can be resolved through a SD2SNES firmware update. Otherwise, I’ll have to desolder and flash one of the SuperCIC chips.

Continue reading SD2SNES Pro SuperCIC Compatibility

Sega Saturn Modifications

This article is about implementing the following Sega Saturn modifications: Region-free BIOS, FRAM, and switchless 50/60 Hz.

But first, we’ll need to go back in time a decade or so. Back then, I was modifying my “This is COOL” skeleton SegaSaturn (HST-0021/HST-3220) like crazy, stuffing everything inside that I could find:

"This is COOL" skeleton SegaSaturn
“This is COOL” skeleton SegaSaturn
Continue reading Sega Saturn Modifications

Philips CDI350 Repair Part 3

It’s been a while since I opened my first Philips CDI350 portable CD-i player and published a repair guide with capacitor list. I have already received some positive feedback that this was helpful for others fixing their players. However, part 2 of the article ended with a big question mark because some topics remained unsolved. Let’s have a look at the status of these topics and see if I can resolve them today in Philips CDI350 Repair Part 3.

1. S-Video output is not working

This turned out to be my fault. After carefully following the traces to and from the video encoder and comparing every component with the service manual, I noticed that I had soldered two electrolytic capacitors with the wrong polarity: C938 and C991. I can only assume that this happened because I used the + marks as indicators and not the white dots. Just look at the vast amount of plusses:

Continue reading Philips CDI350 Repair Part 3

Pippin Atmark Floppy Unit PA-82002

The Bandai Pippin Atmark Floppy Unit PA-82002 is an expansion dock for the Pippin consoles that made it past the prototype stage. It was released on the Japanese market together with the Pippin Atmark in 1996. It is still incredible rare and it took me while to get a hold of one of these units. The functionality is the same that the replica floppy adapter provides and the main reason why I bought it is really the casing. The floppy adapter setup was too unpractical and fragile and I was looking for something sturdier that could stay attached to the console at all times.

This article is mainly about photos and taking it apart. There will be a small section with explanations at the end.

Continue reading Pippin Atmark Floppy Unit PA-82002

Puhui T-962 IR Reflow Oven Modifications

The Puhui T-962 is a cheap IR reflow oven that has been around for many years (the earliest occurrence that I’ve found is from 2007). It has some serious and not so serious flaws that many blogs have already addressed. Known modifications include: Proper grounding, replacing the insulation tape, custom firmware and additional temperature sensors. Some people go even further and replace the system fan and controller board, add more powerful infrared heating elements or an additional fan for better heat distribution. I have included links to all of these modifications at the end of the article.

I bought the T-962 last November to have some support when soldering SMD components. But before I could use it for the first time, I had to take care of the most critical flaws.

Continue reading Puhui T-962 IR Reflow Oven Modifications

Pippin Atmark Wireless Controller Set

This is a new member of my Pippin collection: The Atmark Wireless Controller Set (BDE-82014 / PA-82014). It has the same functionality of the standard AppleJack controller, except that it is wireless. Three infrared LEDs send the signals to a receiver. The set is advertised as compatible with both Pippin Atmark and Macintosh computers. The latter require a P-ADB to ADB adapter and the AppleJack system extension (not included).

Atmark Wireless Controller Set (BDE-82014 / PA-82014)
Pippin Atmark Wireless Controller Set (BDE-82014 / PA-82014)
Continue reading Pippin Atmark Wireless Controller Set

NEC PC-FX Mouse (FX-MOU) Repair

When taking new screenshots for my old PC-FX articles, I noticed that my PC-FX mouse (FX-MOU) didn’t work properly anymore. It still detected the movement fine, but if failed to register one of the mouse buttons. My spare mouse turned out to suffer from this too.

It’s time for a quick repair. Two screws underneath the label hold the mouse together (marked with yellow circles).

NEC PC-FX Mouse (FX-MOU)
NEC PC-FX Mouse (FX-MOU)
Continue reading NEC PC-FX Mouse (FX-MOU) Repair

Philips CDI660 Mono IV NVRAM and 60 Hz Modification

The CDI660/00 is one of the last professional CD-i players by Philips. The mainboard, Mono IV, is also used in various consumer players. So far, there are no tutorials for 60 Hz modification. When this topic came up in the community on The world of CD-i, I looked it up in the CDI220/80 service manual (also Mono IV, with plenty of remarks for other player models) and attempted the modification myself. It has been on my to-do list for quite some years now.
First, we need full access to mainboard. Remove the marked screw of the DVC plastic holder.

CDI660 inside
CDI660 inside
Continue reading Philips CDI660 Mono IV NVRAM and 60 Hz Modification

Capcom CPS2 Digital AV and I/O Interfaces

After finishing the repairs on my CPS2 in April, I had already some more additions in mind:

I had already ordered the digital AV interface kit from VideoGamePerfection.com in the beginning of the year and was only waiting for the I/O interface to get started. Last month, it finally arrived. Also on the picture: a home-made kick harness and a RG174 coaxial cable.

Capcom CPS2 digital AV and I/O interfaces
Capcom CPS2 digital AV and I/O interfaces
Continue reading Capcom CPS2 Digital AV and I/O Interfaces